Wikipedia article of the day for January 19, 2018

The Wikipedia article of the day for January 19, 2018 is Sonic Spinball.
Sonic Spinball is a pinball video game developed by the Sega Technical Institute and published by Sega. It was originally released for the Mega Drive/Genesis in North America and Europe in November 1993 and in Japan the following month. It was later ported to the Game Gear and Master System in 1994 and 1995 respectively. The game has been re-released on eleven different consoles and has been included in Genesis-related compilations. The player controls Sonic the Hedgehog, who is manipulated like a pinball in various machine-like environments for most of the game, while the series antagonist Doctor Robotnik tries to enslave the population on the planet Mobius. Sonic Spinball was commissioned by Sega when it became clear that a new Sonic the Hedgehog game could not be completed in time for the 1993 holiday season, since the majority of their staff were developing Sonic the Hedgehog 3. The game was hastily developed, with most work completed within two months. It received mixed reviews upon release; most critics praised the game’s novelty and graphics but faulted its control scheme.

Source http://handbookblogger.blogspot.com/2018/01/wikipedia-article-of-day-for-january-19.html

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ununennium: Word of the day for January 19, 2018

ununennium , n :
The systematic element name for the (as yet undiscovered) chemical element with an atomic number of 119 (symbol Uue).

Source http://handbookblogger.blogspot.com/2018/01/ununennium-word-of-day-for-january-19.html

Wikipedia article of the day for January 18, 2018

The Wikipedia article of the day for January 18, 2018 is Cleopatra Selene of Syria.
Cleopatra Selene (died 69 BC) was a queen of Seleucid Syria (83–69 BC). The daughter of Ptolemy VIII and Cleopatra III of Egypt, she became the queen of Egypt in 115 BC when she was married to her brother, King Ptolemy IX, and later probably married King Ptolemy X. In 103 BC, Cleopatra III established an alliance with the Seleucid ruler Antiochus VIII; Cleopatra Selene was sent to be his bride, and stayed with him until his assassination in 96 BC. The widowed queen married her previous husband’s brother, Antiochus IX, who died in 95 BC. She then married her stepson, Antiochus X, who probably died in 92 BC. She hid somewhere in Syria with her children until 83 BC, when the Seleucid thrones in Antioch and Damascus became vacant. She declared her son Antiochus XIII king, but he was deposed after the people of Antioch and Damascus, exhausted by the Seleucids’ civil wars, invited foreign monarchs to rule them. She controlled several coastal towns until she was besieged, captured and executed in 69 BC by Tigranes in Ptolemais.

Source http://handbookblogger.blogspot.com/2018/01/wikipedia-article-of-day-for-january-18.html

Wikipedia article of the day for January 17, 2018

The Wikipedia article of the day for January 17, 2018 is Eastbourne manslaughter.
The Eastbourne manslaughter (R v Hopley) was an 1860 legal case in Eastbourne, England, about the death of a teenage pupil at the hands of his teacher, Thomas Hopley. Reginald Cancellor’s parents gave Hopley permission to use corporal punishment to overcome what he perceived as the boy’s stubbornness. After the boy died, the teacher insisted that the beating was justifiable and that he was not guilty of any crime. An inquest into Cancellor’s death began when his brother requested an autopsy. As a result of the inquest Hopley was arrested and charged with manslaughter. He was found guilty at trial and sentenced to four years in prison. Hopley’s conviction was upheld by the Court of King’s Bench (Chief Justice Alexander Cockburn pictured), which said that a schoolmaster “may for the purpose of correcting what is evil in the child, inflict moderate and reasonable corporal punishment.” The trial was sensationalised by the Victorian press and incited debate over the use of corporal punishment in schools. Physical discipline was officially banned in British schools more than a century later.

Source http://handbookblogger.blogspot.com/2018/01/wikipedia-article-of-day-for-january-17.html

emasculate: Word of the day for January 17, 2018

emasculate , v :
(transitive) To deprive of virile or procreative power; to castrate, to geld. (transitive) To deprive of masculine vigor or spirit; to weaken; to render effeminate; to vitiate by unmanly softness. (transitive, botany) Of a flower: to deprive of the anthers.

Source http://handbookblogger.blogspot.com/2018/01/emasculate-word-of-day-for-january-17.html

serac: Word of the day for January 16, 2018

serac , n :
Often sérac: a hard, cone-shaped, pale green, strongly flavoured cheese from Switzerland made from skimmed cowmilk and blue fenugreek (Trigonella caerulea); Schabziger, Sapsago. It is usually eaten grated, mixed with butter, or in a fondue. (geography (glaciology)) A sharp tower of ice formed by intersecting crevasses of a glacier.

Source http://handbookblogger.blogspot.com/2018/01/serac-word-of-day-for-january-16-2018.html